A Week of Saints, August 5-11, 2019

Monday, August 5th: St Paris of Teano, Bishop (died 346)

Many legends exist about him.  The legends say that Paris was of Greek origin, and was the apostle and first bishop of Teano. His miracles included killing a dragon.  The dragon could have been a metaphor for paganism. 

Tuesday, August 6th: Feast of the Transfiguration of the Lord

After six days Jesus took Peter, James, and John his brother, and led them up a high mountain by themselves.*

And he was transfigured before them; his face shone like the sun and his clothes became white as light.And behold, Moses and Elijah appeared to them, conversing with him.Then Peter said to Jesus in reply, “Lord, it is good that we are here. If you wish, I will make three tents* here, one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah.”While he was still speaking, behold, a bright cloud cast a shadow over them,* then from the cloud came a voice that said, “This is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased; listen to him.”When the disciples heard this, they fell prostrate and were very much afraid.But Jesus came and touched them, saying, “Rise, and do not be afraid.”And when the disciples raised their eyes, they saw no one else but Jesus alone

The Gospel of Matthew

Wednesday, August 7th: St Claudia (1st Century)

Claudia was the mother of the second Pope, St Linus.  There are many traditions surrounded St Claudia and who she was.  One such tradition has her the daughter of a captured British king and named for Emperor Claudius, who released her father.  She was then baptized in Rome, and mentioned in Paul’s second letter to Timothy.

Thursday, August 8th: St Dominic (1170-1221)

St. Dominic was born in Spain.  He was ordained, and was noted for his strict adherence to the rule of St. Benedict. He founded the order of the Dominicans. He was devoted to the conversion of the Albigensians. Dominic spent the last years of this life organizing the order, traveling all over Italy, Spain and France. His effort was very successful, as it applied Dominic’s concept of harmonizing the intellectual life with popular needs.

Patron:  astronomers, astronomy, falsely accused people

“A man who governs his passions is master of the world. We must either command them or be enslaved to them.

Friday, August 9th: St Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, Edith Stein, Religious Sister, Martyr  (1892-1942)

Saint Teresa Benedicta of the Cross was born in Poland, and the youngest child of a large Jewish family. She became interested in the Catholic Faith, and was then baptized.  Edith entered the Cologne Carmel, and took the name Teresa Benedicta of the Cross.  She was arrested, and was sent to the concentration camp at Auschwitz. Teresa died in the gas chambers. She  very intelligent, and well versed in philosophy with a particular interest in phenomenology. She has many written works. 

“The nation… doesn’t simply need what we have. It needs what we are.”

Patron:  loss of parents, converted Jews, World Youth Day[

Saturday, August 10th: St Lawrence, Deacon, Martyr (225-258)

Saint Lawrence was one of seven deacons who were in charge of giving help to the poor and the needy. As Pope St. Sixtus was led to his execution, Lawrence followed him weeping, “Father, where are you going without your deacon?” The Pope said,  “I am not leaving you, my son, in three days you will follow me.” Lawrence gave to the poor the rest of the money he had on hand. The Prefect of Rome ordered Lawrence to bring the Church’s treasure to him. Lawrence went through the city and gathered together all the poor and sick. He said: “This is the Church’s treasure!”

In anger, the Prefect condemned Lawrence to a slow, cruel death, of roasting over a fire God gave him so much strength and joy that he even joked. “Turn me over, I’m done on this side!” And just before he died, he prayed that the city of Rome might be converted to Jesus, and that the Catholic Faith might spread all over the world.

Patron:  comedians, librarians, students, miners, tanners, chefs, roasters, poor, firefighters

Sunday, August 11th: St. Clare, Founder Poor Clares (1194-1253)

When she heard St. Francis of Assisi preach, her heart burned with a great desire to imitate Francis and to live a poor humble life for Jesus. So one evening, she ran away from home, and in a little chapel outside Assisi, gave herself to God. St. Francis cut off her hair and gave her a rough brown habit to wear, tied with a plain cord around her waist. Her parents tried in every way to make her return home, but Clare would not.

St. Clare and her sisters wore no shoes, ate no meat, lived in a poor house, and kept silent most of the time.  Once, They we’re saved from an army of rough soldiers, who planned to raid the convent. Where the enemies could see it, Clare had the Blessed Sacrament placed, and begged God to save the Sisters.  At the same time, a sudden fright struck the attackers and they fled as fast as they could.

“They say that we are too poor, but can a heart which possesses the infinite God be truly called poor?”

Patron: sore eyes

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