A Week of Saints: September 30-October 6, 2019

Monday, September 30:  St. Jerome, Priest (331-420)

Jerome is frequently remembered for his temper and sarcastic pen, but his love for God was extraordinary.  He translated the Old Testament  from Hebrew  (the vulgate), and wrote his famous commentary. St Augustine said, “What Jerome is ignorant of, no mortal has ever known.”

He was a master of Latin, Greek, Hebrew and Chaldaic.

“Begin now to be what you will be hereafter.”

Patron: of Librarians

Tuesday, October 1:  St therese of Lisieux, nun (1873 – 1897)

Theresa of the Child Jesus, a Carmelite nun called the “Little Flower,” who lived a cloistered life in France. She saw in quiet suffering redemptive suffering.

All her life St. Thérèse suffered from illness, and died of tuberculosis. She suffered without complaint. She had her “little way”.  St. Therese translated “the little way” in terms of a commitment to the tasks and to the people we meet in our everyday lives.  To do everything with great, even something as simple as picking up a pin. 

“A word or a smile is often enough to put fresh life in a despondent soul.”

Patron:  Missionaries; HIV/AIDS, florists, gardeners, loss of parents, tuberculosis

Wednesday, October 2:  Guardian Angels

Their role is to represent individuals before God, to watch over them always, to aid their prayer and to present their souls to God at death.

“See that you do not despise one of these little ones, for I say to you that their angels in heaven always look upon the face of my heavenly Father.” My 18:10

Many saints have given witness to Guardian Angels, St’s Benedict, Bernard Francis de Sales, Pio, and many more.

“Make yourself familiar with the angels and behold them frequently in spirit; for without being seen, they are present with you.”

St Francis de Sales

Thursday, October 3:  Bl Columba Marmion, monk (1858-1923)

Blessed Columba Marmion was an Irish monk, and was one of the most influential Catholic writers of the 20th century. He believed that a mans love for God was reflected in his love of neighbor. He “possessed an extraordinary facility for adapting himself to other people,” and above all “in comforting others and putting them at their ease.

“The ways of God are entirely different from our ways. To us it seems necessary to employ powerful means in order to produce great effects. This is not God’s method; quite the contrary. He likes to choose the weakest instruments that He may confound the strong”

Friday, October 4:  St Francis of Assisi, priest (1182-1226)

Francis of Assisi followed what Jesus did by how he lived. 

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Much prayer led him to a self-emptying like that of Christ. Embracing a leper on the road manifested his complete obedience to what he had heard in prayer: he would have been content to be the “nothing” man. He gave up everything, and thought a religious fanatic, begging from door to door.  People began to realize his way was love of God. He started the Franciscan Order. During his last years he was half blind and seriously ill. Two years before his death, he received the stigmata.

“A single sunbeam is enough to drive away many shadows.”

Patron: animals, environment 

Saturday, October 5:  St Faustina, religious sister (1905-1938)

Saint Faustina was born in Poland.  When she was almost twenty, she entered the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy, whose members devote themselves to the care and education of troubled young women. She was given the name Sister Maria Faustina, to which she added, “of the Most Blessed Sacrament”. She was asked by our Lord to be a model of how to be merciful to others, and teach God’s plan of mercy for the world. She wrote and suffered in secret, with only her spiritual director and some of her superiors aware that anything special was taking place in her life..

Patron: mercy

“I will not allow myself to be so absorbed in the whirlwind of work as to forget about God.  I will spend all my free moments at the feet of the Master hidden in the Blessed Sacrament.” 

Sunday, October 6:  St Bruno, Priest (c 1030)

Bruno was born in Cologne to a prominent family. He was a professor, but later became a hermit. He and six companions were assigned a hermitage.They built an oratory and individual cells, roughly followed the rule of St. Benedict, and thus began the Carthusian Order. They embraced a life of poverty, manual work, prayer, and transcribing manuscripts..

“For the devil may tempt the good, but he cannot find rest in them; for he is shaken violently, and upset, and driven out, now by their prayers, now by their tears of repentance, and now by their almsgiving and similar good works.”

Patron:  monastic communities, possessed people

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