A Week of Saints

Monday, October 28:  St’s Simon and Jude, Apostles, Martyrs (time of Christ)

St. Jude, was named by Luke and in Acts, but Matthew and Mark call him Thaddeus. He is listed among all the Apostles. Scholars hold that he is not the author of the Letter of Jude. He is brother of James the Less and son of Clopas and Mary, who was the cousin of the Blessed Mother. He preached the Gospel in 

Judea, Samaria, Idumaea, Syria, Mesopotamia, and Lybia. according to ancient writers.

Patron:  Desperate causes, desperate situations, lost causes

St. Simon, sometimes called the Zealot, was son of Cleophas, St. Joseph’s brother, and his mother was possibly Our Lady’s sister. He was successor to St James as  Bishop of Jerusalem,  The Christians fled the city with Simon to Pella on the other side of the Jordan, eventually returning to Jerusalem.  The church here flourished greatly, and that many Jews were converted by the miracles by the saints. He was thought to be 120 yrs old and was put to death by crucifixion.

Tuesday, October. 29:  St. Narcissus of Jerusalem, Bishop (d. 215)

St. Narcissus managed to live well beyond 100. Some even speculate he lived to 160. Details of his life are uncertain, but there are reports of his many miracles. He is most remembered for turning water into oil for use in the church lamps on Holy Saturday.  He was bishop of Jerusalem in the late second century. When he retired as Bishop he went into isolation. Upon returning to Jerusalem he resumed his role as Bishop.

Wednesday, October 30:  St. Alphonsus Rodriguez , Lay Brother(1533-1617)

Alphonsus Rodriguez found happiness and contentment through simple service and prayer.

Born in Spain, at 23 he inherited the family textile business. He lost his wife and daughter, sold his business that wasn’t doing well, and moved with his son to live with his sister..prayer and meditation. He joined the Jesuits, and served as doorkeeper.  His prayerfulness and holiness was noticed in his humble position

“You must strive with all possible care to please God in such a manner as neither to do nor behold anything, without first consulting Him, and in everything to seek Him alone and His glory.”

Thursday, October 31:  St. Wolfgang of Regensburg, Priest (924-994)

Wolfgang was born in Germany, taught in a cathedral school and supported efforts to reform the clergy.  He became a Benedictine monk, was ordained a priest and was made head of the monastery school.  He later went to Hungary as a  missionary. He was appointed Bishop of Regensburg, where he was an effective preacher, initiated clergy reform and had special concern for the poor.

Patron:  apoplexy, Carpenters, paralysis, stomach disease, strokes

Friday, November 1:  All Saints

The feast where the Catholic Church honors its Saints. 

Saturday, November 2:  All Souls

On this day the Church remembers and prays for the dead.

Sunday, November 3:  St Martin de Porres, Priest (1579-1639)

It was said that even as a child St Martin de Porres gave his heart and his goods to the poor..

He was the illegitimate son of a freed woman of Panama, and inherited the features and dark complexion of his mother. Martin was reared in poverty, and locked into a low level of society.  He applied to the Dominicans to be a “lay helper” His example of prayer and penance, charity and humility led the community to request him to make full religious profession. He treated the sick. all people, regardless of their color, race or status. When his priory was in debt, he said, “I am only a poor mulatto. Sell me. I am the property of the order. Sell me.”Martin’s life reflected God’s extraordinary gifts: ecstasies that lifted him into the air, light filling the room where he prayed, bilocation, miraculous knowledge, instantaneous cures and a remarkable rapport with animals. Many of his fellow religious took him as their spiritual director.

“Everything, even sweeping, scraping vegetables, weeding a garden and waiting on the sick could be a prayer, if it were offered to God.

Patron: people of mixed race, innkeepers, barbers, public health workers

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